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,400 years old. here, in a broad valley in central mexico, stand the ruins of what was once the largest city in the new world. beneath an intricate complex of dwellings, archaeologists are uncovering startling evidence of family life. and in italy, as archaeologists explore the ruins of pompeii, new investigations shed light on the nature of the roman family and the surprising role of slaves. who do we live with and why ? what can these ancient families tell us about our own families ? around the world, archaeologists are looking far beyond the palaces and temples into the households of common people, bringing families to life out of the past. come forward all the way. oooh ! that's it. good. hold on me. come forward. ease the baby out with little pushes. come on. you can do it. beautiful ! the baby's coming up to you. waaahh ! keach: every newborn child immediately confronts three basic needs -- food, shelter and education. in the beginning, these needs are met at home. but in industrial societies, that soon changes. teacher: times three... we educate our children in schools. how would you
the northern border region and from the metropolitan center, including mexico city. ar regio has, for almost a hundred years, been the west central region, that is, jalisco, michoacan. and we found that indeed, it was still t most important gion forendingignts. narrator: jones then sees a surprising cluster here, whe heecit. s:noceral mexico hascarcely been udd byociascntists. weererore suri s:noceral mexico hascarcely been udd heagni omigrat bfrom the nend a aso is was, weererore suri s:noceral mexico but to verify this, i needed to go into the field. narrator: nes's research has brought him here, to the mesa dee, a high dry plateau beginning near mexico city and stretching to the u.s. border. and employment here:ditiaa gold andilver mining. but one look at the mines and a talk wh some remaining workers coirms the sad economic stistics. butchear mesutestand a drop ine talk wh some remaining workers haveut many bs here. jones: what we found in the north central region was a decline in proction and in employment in the mining sector, which corresponded, spatially, remarkably closely to the mi
of a future world in america. "i see a thousand kingdoms raised, cities and men, numerous as sand upon the ocean shore. the ohio then shall glide by many a town of note, and where the mississippi stamy forest shaded now runs weeping on, cities shall grow, and states, not less in fame than greece and rome." ( music ) ( music ) narrator: the east buiing of the national gallery of art in washing d.c.- built to relieve the heavily- burdened facilities of the original gallery, to house temporary exhibitions, and to serve as a center for advanced study in the visual arts. within these walls, visitors to our nation's capital are drawn in to a very special place where monumental accomplishments of modern masters await discovery. built on a trapezoidal plot of land adjoining the original gallery, the east building is of a unique and radical design, utilizing triangular shapes with large interior spaces. it was a collaborative effort spanning more than ten years. director j. carter brown worked closely with architect i. m. pei in its development. seven works of art were commissioned it was agree
promised by the bab. he did this in the city of baghdad, after he had been sent out of tehran, which was his home and banished to baghdad. after he declared that he was the one the bab had promised and all the religions of the past had promised, he was banished again to what was constantinople, now istanbul. he was banished still further to other places in a further attempt by the government and the clergy to eliminate the followers of bahÁ'u'llah. since his faith was growing very rapidly there was considerable concern that it was recruiting too many people and was growing too rapidly and gaining too much power. and their desire was to stamp it out. in that part of the middle east, the bahai faith was viewed as a heresy, because it came after islam. it is unfortunately often said that the bahai faith is a sect of islam. that could only be said if christianity were to be called a sect of judaism. since the bahai faith came from islam in much the same way that christianity came from judaism. so that's the derivation of the bahai faith. but the faith then spread then rapidly throughout
. - hello ? - hello, miss robinson. "this is your lucky day. you are the big winner in the city sweepstakes." that's wonderful but what did i win ? "you've won a number of valuable prizes, but most important, "as a city winner, you can compete for the national sweepstakes. "you could win $1 million a year for the rest of your life. -what do you think about that ?" -i don't know what to say. "a sweepstakes representative will stop by your house to collect a small entry fee." an entry fee ? how much ? "only $100. can you believe it ? pennies compared to the millions of dollars... "you could receive over the next 40 or so what time would you like us to come over ?" [ narrator ] if you have questions about a product or the people who are selling it, call the better business bureau. they keep records of businesses people complain about and will share this information with you. a hundred dollars ? i have to pay you $100 ? i don't think so. [ narrator ] if a bargain sounds too good to be true, it generally is. and this one-gallon refill is only $5.
afford to escape the city heat and spend summers at the shore. homer's relatives on both sides had been engaged in shipping and trading for generations. his father, charles savage homer, carried on an import business. his mother, henrietta benson homer, was a watercolorist whose flower pictures were occasionally shown in professional exhibitions. winslow was born in boston in 1836. at t age of 21, after two years of drudgery apprenticed to a commercial lithographer, he vowed he would never have another master and set up his studio at 22 winter street, in a building with publisher m.m. ballou. true to his new england background, homer was forthright and self-reliant. above all, he valued his independence, soon establishing himself as a free-lance illustrator for ballou's pictorial. homer's first important illustration was published in 1857, and within a year, his work began to appear in harper's weekly. his early pictures recorded the ordinary manners and pleasures of american life, reflecting a mood of national self-confidence prior to the civil war. his sketch of the skating pond in ce
the city heat and spend summers at the shore. homer's relatives on both sides had been engaged in shipping and trading for generations. his father, charles savage homer, carried on an import business. his mother, henrietta benson homer, was a watercolorist whose flower pictures were occasionally shown in professional exhibitions. winslow was born in boston in 1836. at the age of 21, after two years of drudgery apprenticeto a commercial lithographer, he vowed he would never have another master and set up his studio at 22 winter street, in a building with publisher m.m. ballou. true to his new england background, homer was forthright and self-reliant. above all, he valued his independence, soon establishing himself as a free-lance illustrator for ballou's pictorial. homer's first important illustration was published in 1857, and within a year, his work began to appear in harper's weekly. his early pictures recorded the ordinary manners and pleasures of american life, reflecting a mood of national self-confidence prior to the civil war. his sketch of the skating pond in central park was publi
and particularly we are talking about socio-economic differences in the united states particularly a big city like los angeles. and also, unfortunately, racism. so if we could, let's hear keith respond to some questions about new directions for religion in america. one of the important goals of believes and believers is, for students to develop an appreciation for religious diversity. we're very fortunate today to have professor keith naylor, who is a professor of religious studies at occidental college in los angeles. keith, we're seeing in society a further gap in terms of the haves and have-nots, sort of a socio-economic gap. is this going to affect the organization of religions or are we going to see religions further splitting according to who has wealth and who doesn't in our society? >> well, i think we've already seen some of that in some places. but, being in los angeles i am seeing a different kind of model where, and i think this is the value of living a major urban centre-- where churches are and other religious groups are really seeing their mandate as closing that divide and bringing
of these particles and these, all flying apart, is awesome. the energy that takes to light up new york city comes about as a result of water pouring over niagara falls. and every water drop has an energy of about this much, four electron volts. electron volts are tiny unit of energy. it's microscopic unit of energy, yeah? but four electron volts per water drop, tnt-- [makes sounds] --you get about 30 electron volts. high-octane gasoline, about 30 electron volts per molecule of combustion, yeah? one atom, u235, fissions, you get about 200 million electron volts of energy. awesome, awesome. an awful lot of energy for one atom, and that kinda changed the world. and so we now talk about the atomic age or more properly the nuclear age because we're talking about an awful lot of energy for just a little bit of matter. it turns out the most common isotopic uranium is uranium-- let me try it over here-- uranium 238. and when 238 catches a neutron, what it does is it turns to u239. u238 emits alpha particles, but 239 emits beta particles. and guess what the 239 does, gang? it turns into an element beyond
. "i'll grubstake you. i'll get you groceries. "i'll feed you and i'll grubstake me. "maybe city college will let you use some of their equipment and we'll make a little animated movie." and he made an animated movie on everything that we-- would you like to see it? okay. roll it, lionel. we'll see it right here, gang. right here. ♪ where did the time go? ♪ does anybody, does anybody know? ♪ ♪ when did the day break? ♪ did someone drop it, was it a mistake? ♪ ♪ la, la, la, la la, la, la... did you know that time's different when you move at different speeds, that when you move through space, you change the rate at which you move into the future? well, you can't really notice these differences for everyday speeds, but for really high speeds like for rockets traveling about half the speed of light, these time differences can be noticed. let's take a look at the so-called twin paradox. well, bye. i don't know if i'll see you again. and while the traveling twin experiences weeks... the stay-at-home twin experiences years. you know, i think i'll just sit here and do noth
in this city, and they say, "you know, this doctor told me to do this, what should i do?" i tell them to go to an academic medical center. now, are they as user-friendly as, you know, the slick private clinics out there? no, they're often not, but the science and the knowledge is there. do they invariably have the art that a good, homey, family-medicine doctor will have? no. no. i don't take any pride in the fact that we haven't been able to get everybody to have a good bedside manner, but the science is there. and sometimes it's worthwhile to just gird your belt and accept a big academic medical center so you can get the best opinion you can. of course, i want to see diplomas on the wall, and, you know, i want to see that they've been published and all that sort of thing. but, to me, far more important is the doctor's ability to connect with me as a human being. the relationship between doctor and patient-- that human connection-- plays a role in the healing process that sometimes goes beyond degrees and scientific knowledge. marc shiffman: there are 11 residents down here at vario levels
at a unique ranch. >> the overall theme is, wow, it's pretty spectacular. >> then, farming in the city? sound impossible? not for these folks. >> this is my land, but it's everybody's land. >> next, meet a farmer and a chef who make the perfect pair--terally. >> i think pears are great because they're--i like the versatility. >> then, ever wonder how to pick the best summertime produce? we've got the tricks of the trade from a pro. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [moo] >> here in the tiny town of santa margarita, they have a population of only 1,300. but what they lack in size, they more than make up for in history. that's thanks to its legendary occupant, the santa margarita ranch, one of the oldest, continuously operated cattle ranches in california, and one that draws oohs and ahs from both its visitors and owners. >> the overall theme is, wow, it's pretty spectacular. most people that look at it, just go, ooh, blows you asay. >> this was the most idyllic place in the county. and i really do believe, today, it is truly one of the crown jewels of san luis obispo county. >> i don't know t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12